Choosing The Best Metal Roof For Your House

Metal Roofing – Ultimate Buying Guide

Unbiased, expert advice on how to buy metal roofing, types of metal roofing including standing-seam metal roofing and metal shingles. Includes advice about brands, colors, metal roofing from Lowe’s and Home Depot, hiring a metal roof contractor, and more

In this article, we’ll take a close look at metal roofing and help you decide whether or not it is right for your home. If it is, we’ll walk you step-by-step through everything you need to know when choosing the right metal roofing for your needs. Then we’ll advise you on how to get the job done

Metal roofs are favored for their fire-resistant qualities, longevity, and speed of installation (in most cases, they are installed by qualified metal roofing contractors. The material is also surprisingly lightweight and great at reflecting heat from the sun, a characteristic that helps homeowners save energy and may even qualify for tax credits.

If you think metal is far too commercial looking for your home, take a closer look below at the variety of products on the market. It’s true that architectural standing-seam roofing panels may have an overly commercial look for some home styles. But many metal roofing materials mimic the appearance of other materials, such as tile roofing. These may look right at home on your house.

Metal Roof Materials

When it comes to roofing, the word “metal” covers a lot of territory. Metal roofing is produced from a variety of materials, including steel, aluminum, stainless steel, copper, and zinc alloys. Of course, each one of these has clear differences that affect durability, price, appearance, and more.

 

CHOOSING A METAL ROOF

There’s a lot to be said for a metal roof’s snazzy looks and top-notch performance. The right roof can liven the home’s curb appeal and provide years of superior low-maintenance protection. Today’s residential metal roofing comes in a wide variety of styles and designs. Metal roofing materials are not only light weight but can be very energy efficient. And unlike asphalt roofs, which require re-roofing every 15 to 20 years, metal roofs won’t decompose. These roofs can withstand rain, fire, earthquakes and hurricane-force winds.

Although the initial investment in a metal roof is steeper than most other roofing materials, over time a metal roof can save a great deal of money and hassle. This is because there is no second investment in roof replacement, or the labor that comes with it. Metal roofs are practically maintenance-free, requiring only the occasional rinse with a garden hose. And most metal roofs come with a 30- to 50-year warranty. Insurance companies in certain states, like Texas, even offer discounts of up to 35 percent to homeowners with metal roofs.

When selecting a metal roof, first make sure the product’s design is an appropriate match to your home’s construction. Most metal roofs require solid decking. Many systems are frequently installed over existing shingle roofs. Some can be installed over lathe boards or over wood shingles on lathe. Some new products can even be installed over existing slate and asbestos roofs.

Next, choose a material that complements the décor of your home and neighborhood. You can find quality metal roofing with just about any appearance, whether it’s standing seam or a facsimile of shake, slate, tile or standard shingles. Some of today’s metal roofs are coated with a granular texture to look like traditional asphalt shingles

Base Metal

Metal roofing is fabricated from a wide variety of metals, including galvanized steel, galvalume steel, aluminum, copper and zinc alloy—even stainless steel. The metals differ in properties, and the type used sometimes depends on the design of the roofing panel. Consider all the available options

 

How to Pick the Right Metal Roof Color

Choosing a color for your new metal roof is an exciting process, especially today, when you have more options available to you than ever before. However, it’s important to not get lost in the abundance of available color choices! 😉 keep in mind that the color you choose will greatly affect the overall look and feel of your home.

Quality of Paint Finish: Kynar 500 vs. Acrylic Paints

It is crucial to select a high quality paint for your metal roof that will stand up to the elements, while looking fresh and new for years to come. Make sure to choose a paint that has been treated with a special acrylic resin that blocks ultraviolet light. It will help prevent premature fading, peeling, corrosion, rust and water infiltration.

It is also possible to apply different types of coatings and sealants as an additional protective layer decades down the road, which will make the paint last longer, and will protect the metal from sun rays, moisture and mildew.

Style of Your Home

The color of metal that you choose for your roof needs to match the overall style of your home. Choose a color based on all the elements of your home’s exterior design, such as the color of the siding, doors, windows, landscape, etc.

Achieve Desired Effects with Any Roof Color

Today, color choices available in metal roofing are virtually limitless, so it is up to you to decide what effect you want to achieve with the color of your roof

 

How to Choose A Beautiful Metal Roof for Your Beautiful Home

Choosing the right roof for your home can be a daunting task. Congratulations, if you’ve found your way to metal as the most versatile, sustainable, and protective roofing material available. But, now what? With so many options to choose from, we thought we would give you some insider information on how to choose the right, beautiful metal roof for your beautiful home.

Style

One of the beauties of metal roofing is the wide variety of panel profiles (styles) which are available. Homeowners can choose from corrugated looks to true standing seams to shake, slate, shingle, and tile facsimiles. But which “look” is best for your home? While this is a matter of personal choice, not every profile “fits” aesthetically and stylistically with every house.

Scale

When choosing the right look for your home, it is important to keep “scale” in mind. For example, if your home is only 50’ in width, using a 24” wide standing seam panel may be overpowering because you will end up with just 25 panels across the entire width of the roof. Likewise, a very “heavy” looking shake or tile profile may be too much for a smaller home.

Neighborhood

Keep your neighbors and neighborhood in mind when choosing a profile. You want to add to your home’s value. This can be achieved by setting your home apart from others in your neighborhood in terms of distinction and beauty. However, accidentally making your home stand out like a sore thumb through the color or product you choose can detract from home value and also not enamor yourself to your neighbors.

Choose a Roof Design Expert

The installer you choose for your roof should not only have an excellent history of roofing, but he or she should also have an eye for the design and know which product will complement the beauty of your home. In some cases, your metal roofing supplier may bring sample panels so you can see for yourself and have a better idea of what a particular product may look like on your home. Some metal roofing manufacturers offer “imaging” software that shows a photo of your house with different roof profiles and colors that can be superimposed onto your home. These things, along with the expertise and experience of your manufacturer, will help you make an informed decision on the profile and color that best showcases your home.

 

A Guide to Selecting the Right Metal Roof Panel

With the great variety on the market, one of the main questions we, as metal roof panel manufacturers, get from customers is “How do I select the right panel for my project?” The answer can generally be found by examining a number of criteria, including the properties of the roof, the region and climate, geometry, slope, warranty type…among other key factors.

Slope— Slope is the first consideration as just this one aspect will eliminate certain panels, making it easier to narrow down options right from the start. The two types of roof slopes are low slope and steep slope

 

A low-slope roof, commonly found in commercial applications, is one whose slope is less than 3:12. The benefits include a simpler geometry that is often much less expensive to construct, and the requirement of fewer materials than a steep slope, thereby reducing material costs.

A steep slope roof, more common in residential construction, is one whose slope is greater than 3:12. Steeper slopes are ideal for areas that have higher snow loads and will also prevent the possibility of ponding water on the roof. Since the roof is a visible part of the structure, choosing a metal roof for residential construction often skews more toward aesthetic considerations.

Location/Climate— The location and climate of the project is a factor, specifically when looking at certifications/regulatory product approvals, which will limit the panels you can you use within specific regions.